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The Awesome Page Of Millet Recipes Links!

Greetings!

There are several individual blogs and pages that have millet recipes.
I wanted to make a momma of all pages for the millet recipes, so that
you can get all at the same page!

To start with, I have compiled the currently active pages that have the
millet recipes. In the future, I want to update this blog into sections for
breakfast, lunch, dinner, sweets, occasional recipes, so that you can quickly
find the ones that you are looking for.

Here we go! :

https://in.pinterest.com/whiskaffair/millet-recipes/
https://www.indianhealthyrecipes.com/recipes/millets/
http://cookingwithmillets.com/
https://www.sharmispassions.com/millet-recipes-indian-millet-recipes/
http://vegrecipesofkarnataka.com/siridhanya-millets-recipes.php
https://www.archanaskitchen.com/tag/millet-recipes
https://www.padhuskitchen.com/p/millet-recipes.html
https://www.masalaherb.com/millet-recipes/
https://verygoodrecipes.com/millet
https://cookpad.com/in/search/finger%20millethttp://millets.res.in/m_recipes/Millets_Recipes-A_Healthy_choice.pdf
https://truweight.in/blog/food-and-nutrition/millet-weight-loss-recipes-health-benefits-side-effects.html
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipes/16729/ingredients/whole-grains/millet/
https://www.hungryforever.com/top-10-millet-recipes-for-breakfast/
http://swayampaaka.com/category/millet-recipes/
https://www.foodnetwork.com/topics/millethttps://millets.wordpress.com/recipes/
http://www.jopreetskitchen.com/millets-recipeshttps://draxe.com/millet-recipes/
http://archive.gramene.org/species/setaria/foxtailmillet_recipes.html
https://www.huffingtonpost.in/archana-doshi/the-15-millet-recipes-tha_b_6442068.html http://vegetarianindianrecipes.com/recipes/indian-millet-recipes/
https://www.subbuskitchen.com/millets-recipes/
http://www.spiceindiaonline.com/category/recipes/millets/http://www.nithyas-kitchen.com/category/millet-recipes
http://farmtotable.colostate.edu/prepare-resources/millet-recipes.pdf
https://www.tarladalal.com/recipes-using-sanwa-millet-1157
https://www.goldenprairieinc.com/gluten-free-recipes/five-minute-millet.html
https://detoxinista.com/millet-veggie-burgers/
https://cuisineindia.wordpress.com/tag/kodo-millet-recipes/
https://earlyfoods.com/blogs/baby-food-recipes/tagged/millet-recipes
https://shasthaonline.com/blogs/news/millet-recipes
https://www.allaboutfasting.com/millet-recipes.html
https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/whole-grain-millet-recipes-zmaz08djzgoe
https://www.healthsutra.in/recipeshttp://www.itsfuntocookbn.com/category/millet-recipes/
http://www.youreverydaycook.com/2014/07/millet-recipes-at-glance/
https://www.thedailymeal.com/best-recipes/millet

Standard disclaimer: As with anything that you intake, you should consult with your doctor/nutritionist/dietitian on your personal health circumstances on what is appropriate for you.

Thank you!

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Millets: The Proso Pongal!

So, We had tasty, tasty Proso Pongal today!

What’s Proso Pongal? 🤐

Have you heard of Millets, by the way? Some of us would say No. Because we have forgotten.

Well, Millets is a staple food, just like rice and wheat. They consume just 10% of water compared to rice while production.

Millets are rich in micronutrients and better for health than rice and wheat – it releases sugar in the blood very slowly. Guess what that means? Less risk of diabetes and better diabetes management.

Now, about Proso Pongal… the recipe is the same as traditional rice Pongal, so no need to rack your brain!

Go get Proso Millet from your nearby retailer for around 70 rupees per kg. It’s a bit expensive than rice, but it’s all worth it considering the health benefits and the social cause of water conservation!

We have decided to skip rice Pongal from now on, and going for Millets Pongal at our home. How about you?!

 


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The Water Problem – Episode 4 – The Heroes

Local people taking the responsibility of water resources in their area in their hands is the pinnacle of effective water management in India.

The town of Moodbidri northeast of Mangalore is a shining example of how they take care of their water sources, and came out of perilous situation that prevailed before. You can read about their story here: https://www.thebetterindia.com/159078/moodbidri-water-revival-karnataka-news-india

Together, as a community, Moodbidri has restored 18 water resources!  They worked on reinstating the old water storage bodies by cleaning them and making them hold pure water!  That’s gold!

India is facing huge water shortage because of real estate, agriculture, and mindless human reproduction.  Local efforts like this give us hope. We will continue to create awareness about how to take care of ourselves.

If you are inspired by this story, please share it far and wide in your social media circles and talk about it to your contacts through word of mouth.

Love always!

Photo by Linus Nylund on Unsplash

 


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Why natural calamities will have multi-fold effect on India Population

Kerala is reeling under floods. More than 100 people have lost their lives just yesterday. The shutters of all the dams in the state have been opened. Though Kerala gets heavy rains every year, this year, the quantum was too much.

A study showed that the effect of extreme natural conditions on the population will be too much because of two reasons: more and more people moving into low-lying areas because of lack of space, continuing land development because of which drainage paths and canals are being blocked due to which flash floods happen in unexpected land areas.

The root cause is very certain. We have become too much in number. We need to stop the reproduction, otherwise, nature will be nature and it won’t show mercy on anyone.

Adoption, instead of reproduction is a sensible option: http://cara.nic.in

Thanks for reading.


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The Water problem – Episode 3 – The Heroes

Whenever we talk about big issues like population, food, or water, all of us are taken aback on what we could do on a personal level. In fact, we restrict our efforts to very minimal, get satisfied that that’s all we could do. While every small efforts are appreciated, we need to think out-of-the-box, open up our minds and look at things at various angles on how we could help.

Many of us are well-educated, with degrees on various subjects, and will be able to help in several ways. Many heroes are inspiring to me in how much we could help. I came across one inspiring example today in Times of India – in the article about how a 82-year old man constructed 14 tanks in an arid region to keep his hill green!  In fact, he had invested whatever he had just for this cause!  Such ingenuity and enterpreneurship is the need of the hour – to solve our big problems!

If a man with very scarce resources can do so much, imagine how much we could do! It’s just a matter of heart. In today’s world of instant reachability and abundant resources, I don’t think it would never be a problem for us.

More to come!


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What should India eat?

India has gone through roller-coaster rides in terms of food.  There have been huge famines, but of late, there’s huge availability of food in terms of rice and wheat.  We should be pretty happy, but at the same time, got to be very cautious on what we consume, as the rice and wheat food has led to chronic health conditions because of the unhealthy life style that we adopt.

Last week, I saw an article on how rice and wheat are consuming too much of water to grow, and how it is not sustainable.  No, this is not a propaganda of the Genetically Modified crops lobby. I also read another article on how heart diseases in India has increased in the past 26 years.

Reading these has led me to believe that we should cut down on rice and wheat cultivation and grow more millets, which are healthy as well as consume less water. A healthy lifestyle is of course necessary, but not every one of us get the opportunity (sometimes it is even a luxury) to exercise, work out and stay fit.  Diet is an important component in the equation (by the way, the whole equation is Diet + Exercise + Less Stress) for a healthy lifestyle.

As we already know, because of our sedentary life style, India has been declared as the diabetic capital of the world, so we should only help ourselves with less rice!

Here are some stuff that I have in my list to improve the situation:

  • Cut down on the rice and wheat consumption myself, and let my family and friends know
  • Talk to the land-owners and agriculturists that I know about this and make them grow more millets
  • Talk to the healthy food restaurants chains about this and make them deliver more millets-based food rather than rice and wheat based
  • Oh, and yes, share a lot of millets-based menus and recipes!

So, what is your plan of action?  A small step in the right direction makes a lot of difference!

Thank you for your attention and time!


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The Water Problem (Episode 2)

Recently I wrote about the looming water problem in India. At that time, all I had was questions on the enormity of the issue, and how we can tackle this. I made a bucket list of all the stuff that I can do, and I quickly followed up with a few people I knew on social media and otherwise, and the results were a bit comforting, although the efforts are long-drawn projects that need constant follow-ups.

I was deeply heartened to see that many people are actually working on the water already at various levels – creating awareness, conducting sessions, executing implementations to effectively use groundwater and rainwater, and coming up with innovations that can made radical improvements to the abilities to store water.

Two of such groups that I came across were The Rainwater Club and Bhungroo. Both of them are well-known in the water circles for their work. The Rainwater Club is doing their work mostly in Karnataka and Tamilnadu, while Bhungroo has projects all over the world, but head-quartered in Gujarat.

The Rainwater Club has modules to conduct trainings and sessions in the schools, so that awareness can be created among the children. It would be great to partner with them to conduct sessions at your schools, especially if you are a group of institutions or a chain of schools.

Bhungroo is all about implementation, you can reach out to them to implement their solution in the usually drought-hit areas of your state, to see if their solution would help the situation.

These two were great starts for me to do something about the areas that I know of, while I am talking to someone in Kerala to see if there’s a potential solution for their unique issue of land level being the same as sea level along the coast, and hence water cannot be stored underground!  I am also planning to be in touch with a unique project in south India, to partner with them for projects and training on water for school children.

I will keep you posted!